Hybrid Tomatoes, a Few Weeks Later

It’s my first report on my hybrid tomatoes (see the original post here at hybrid tomato experiment).   So how are all the plants doing?  Well, there’s good news and bad news — here’s what’s happening.

I planted 8 F2 seeds, and all sprouted — good news so far, especially since they looked pretty good.  Too bad it didn’t stay that way!  (On the other hand, that’s the reason for experiments — you never know what will happen.)

Of my original 8 seedlings, four have survived.  OK, 6 survived, but two of them were growing only so-so.  Since I want plants that thrive, I pulled ’em up and tossed them.  Yes, it seems harsh, but I don’t need plants that don’t do well for me.

Hybrid Tomatoes That Survived

Of the four plants that have grown well, two are determinates, one is indeterminate and the other seems almost between the two — like a stocky indeterminate.

One of the determinates, plus the one that’s a definite indeterminate, have flowers — a good sign!  So these two are in the running for keeping seeds from the tomatoes they produce.  But does that mean that the other two don’t have a chance (except for eating what they produce)?

No, part of this experiment is on how they grow and how soon they produce, but the other part is the actual fruit — how large the tomatoes and even more important — how they taste.  There’s really no reason to grow tomatoes that are bland or mushy in texture.  So earliness is only part of the reason to grow a variety.

I also live in a very hot and humid place — it’s only April, but it’s been over 90 degrees several times already this season.  So any plant that can grow and produce fruit in my location gets an automatic vote for keeping seeds from it.

Stay tuned!

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