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The Taste is Amazing!

Containter Growing

DIY Indoor Hydroponic Tomatoes

DIY indoor hydroponic tomatoes have caught my attention recently, thanks to my husband.  He was browsing on the internet and somehow came across some ebooks on hydroponics, and he bought them for me.  Seeing as the soil here in Tennessee (at least in my yard) is clay and rock (yikes!) I had planned on growing tomatoes in containers.  Well, hubby thought that if I planned to do containers, why not hydroponics?

No lugging home bags and bags of potting mix, compost, perlite, etc. and getting dirty in the process.  (I had calculated I would need something like 10 bags (40 lbs each) of potting mix, another 10 to 15 of compost, plus the perlite, vermiculite and such to start from scratch up here.)

Hydroponic Ebooks and Their Effect

So, I read the ebooks, and it didn’t seem to be very feasible for me.  All those pumps and airlines, flowing water, misters and so on.  The garden area I have picked out has 1) no water and 2) no electricity.  The nearest hose bib is about 50 or so feet away, and there are zero electrical outlets.

Just for fun, I went onto Amazon and looked up some hydroponic systems, and I wasn’t overly fond of some of the full-blown systems.  They were actually less expensive than I thought they would be, but they seemed to be more for leafy veggies and herbs than tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, etc.

Then I came across something very, very intriguing.

Enter the Kratky Method of Hydroponics

Hmmm, here was something interesting!  Dr. B.A. Kratky of the University of Hawaii came up with a hydroponics system that required no pumps, no circulating water, no mister, no electricity.  The setup described seemed perfect for growing just about anything…like tomatoes and peppers and cucumbers.  Lettuce, herbs, flowers, squash — a multitude of plants.

Wow — no electrical outlets needed, no misters, no hoses!  It’s a “set it and forget it” system.

I’ll write up a whole post about the Kratky Method (as it is now known) and how it works, but it seems to be very easy to set up.  Pick a good sized container, cut some holes in the lid, grab some net pots and fertilizer, add water and you’re good to go.  (Yes, there is a little more to it than that, but it’s a broad outline)

Growing Tomatoes in a DIY Hydroponic Setup

It’s still Winter, and here in Eastern Tennessee it’s still pretty chilly at night — in the 30s, and the days are in the upper 40s.  But it’s not too soon to start seeds!  And I have decided to run a test for growing some micro-dwarf tomatoes indoors using a very, very DIY (and very inexpensive) setup.  Like a gallon water jug, some fertilizer, a net pot and good lighting.  Oh, and tomato seedlings!

Growing Indoors – and a Test!

The test will also be comparing growing the tomatoes in a hydroponic setup versus a grow bag.  I’ve picked the tomato variety Red Robin since it’s a micro-dwarf (only getting 8 or so inches tall).

I’ll have the hydroponic tomato plant in a 1-gallon water jug, and the other plant in a 1-gallon grow bag with a potting mix.  They will be growing side-by-side in a south-facing window, and I will also have some supplemental lighting.

Container Gardening Too

Not to fear, I will still be doing some regular container gardening with my grow bags.  I’ve had plenty of experience with grow bags, and none with hydroponics.  I want to make sure that if I do something wrong with the hydro, I’ll still have some plants growing the usual methods!  (Gotta have some homegrown tomatoes, in any way I can get them.)

So look for more posts on the Kratky hydroponics setup, how the plants are growing, and tomatoes in general.  It should be a very interesting gardening year!

Growing Tomatoes Indoors

Growing tomatoes indoors is something new I am trying out.  Starting seeds indoors, sure, but actually growing the plants inside and harvesting the tomatoes?  With my new location, it’s something I’m dying to try!

Tomatoes for Growing Indoors

I won’t be able to grow a full-sized tomato plant indoors, but I should be able to grow a mini tomato plant; something that is no more than about 12 inches tall.  There are some where it’s claimed they can grow in a 4 inch container — but I want more tomatoes than something that small could give me.  Some good tomato varieties that are in the 10 to 12 inch size range are Red Robin and Tiny Tim.  Since I already have seeds for Red Robin, I think that’s what I’ll plant.

What’s Needed for Growing Tomatoes Indoors

Tomatoes need a place to live (a pot), light, water, soil and food (fertilizer).

  • Light:  Obviously, good light is necessary.  While I do have a south-facing window, I don’t think it will be enough to support a good harvest.  I’ll invest in some grow lights to supplement the light I do get.
  • Pot/Container:  My tomato plant needs a place to live, but I don’t have a ton of space.  I’m going to go with a 1-gallon self-watering container (8 inch diameter).
  • Water:  Easy enough, especially with a self-watering container.
  • Soil:  I’ll need something that drains well, but also helps to hold moisture.  In other words, I don’t want the water to just go through the pot before the roots can get the moisture — nor do I want the plants to have so much moisture that they have wet feet!  A mix of potting soil, perlite and some sphagnum moss should give me what I need.
  • Fertilizer:  I think I can use the same fertilizer I use on my african violet and streptocarpus plants, which is a mixture of Miracle Gro for Orchids and Miracle Gro for Roses.  I may be able to add some Sea Magic fertilizer, but because the plant will be indoors in closed room, fish emulsion is not an option.  😉  The fertilizer will be 1/2 strength, every other time I water.

What’s Missing?

Well, the tomato seedlings are missing!  I’ve been itching to plant some tomato seeds, so this will be my chance to try out my new seed starting trays and heated seed germination mat.

Just for fun, I think I will also try to grow a Red Robin plant outside as well, and see what the difference is.  Well, I’m sure it will grow better since it will be in a 3-gallon container, but the question is how much better?

Homegrown Tomato Garden – New Decade, New Location

Happy New Year!  My homegrown tomato garden is celebrating the new decade in a new location.  I don’t live in S. Florida anymore — I am in eastern Tennessee.  My normal growing pattern is topsy-turvey; no Winter planting, but I do get to grow through the summer.

I’ve gone from 10a for a plant hardiness zone to 7a.  Which basically means a chilly winter with plenty of freezes, and a last expected frost date in mid-April.  But interestingly so far, with all the frosts we’ve had so far this Fall and Winter, our yard doesn’t seem to collect frost; across the street does, though.  Talk about being in a micro-climate!

Primary Grow Space

Different State, Different Soil for the Tomatoes

I’m used to sandy soil, which is fairly easy to dig up.  I had a lovely spot planned for the garden for my homegrown tomatoes; I was going to rototill it, put down plenty of compost.  First, I decided to plant a few daffodil bulbs nearby.  Imagine my surprise when instead of an easy to dig soil, I found compacted clay and rocky soil.  Argh!  (I barely got 10 bulbs planted before I gave up.)

There goes my plans for rototilling the garden.  I’d have to put down so much compost and perlite that I’d be rototilling for weeks, and spend many hundreds of dollars.  With those plans out the window, I’m turning to container gardening.

Container Tomato Garden For 2020

Secondary Grow Space

Fortunately, I’ve had a lot of experience with container gardening my tomatoes.  The approximately 12 x 7 foot garden plot will be festooned with 3-gallon, 5-gallon, 7-gallon and 10-gallon grow bag containers.  I have some room to expand a little to the northeast of that plot, maybe a little more across the walkway.

Right now it doesn’t look like much; well, it is the tag end of December.  I still have to pull up one bush that is in my way, but I think it’s small enough to not give me too much trouble.  But, it faces southeast and is protected by the house on 3 sides, giving it another micro-climate; I may be able to put out at least some of my plants a week or so before the last expected frost date.

Well, this should be interesting, to say the least!  My growing situation is much different from where I gardened for some 20 years.  I am very much looking forward to see what kind of homegrown tomatoes I can successfully garden here, and share the results with you.  😀

Soil for Container Gardening

You’ve decided to create a container garden of one or more containers, or are using raised beds.  You have the containers/beds…but what do you fill them with?  As I mentioned in my tomatoes in containers post, it’s time to talk soil.

Ready Made or Mix Your Own?

To be honest, I would rather go with pre-bagged, if I could find exactly what I wanted, in the amounts I needed, at a good price.  Given that I am still trying to fill something along the lines of 15 containers from 5 to 25 gallons each, that doesn’t quite work out — for me or the plants.  For that kind of quantity, quality bagged potting soil can be expensive.  However, if you are just filling a couple of 5 gallon containers, bagged potting soil might be just right for you.

The most important thing for container plants is that the roots have enough water and air.  In order for water and air to penetrate the soil, it needs little spaces to slip into.

As a somewhat exaggerated example, it’s almost impossible for air and water to penetrate much into concrete.  However, water and air pass easily through gravel.  (Although I don’t recommend trying to grow in either, LOL.)  😉

So what you are looking for is soil that has enough space for air and water, but not so much that water pours right though it.  Just keep thinking about Goldilocks and getting the mixture “just right”.  😉

Potting Mix, Garden Soil – What’s the Difference?

A potting mix is made especially for growing plants in containers.  A bag of garden soil, though, is made to be mixed in with your current soil — not just placed in your containers without any intervention.

A good potting mix is fluffy, with plenty of perlite or vermiculite and sphagnum peat moss or coconut coir (in addition to compost, of course).  Garden soil tends to be heavy, with little or no perlite, vermiculite or moss/coir.  Putting the bagged garden soil into your containers without lightening it up some will doom your plants to a slow death.  Or at the very least, a much smaller harvest, because the plant roots have a hard time breathing.

What About “Mel’s Mix”?

Mel Bartholomew, of Square Food Gardening (SFG) fame, recommends the following mix.  Although I don’t use the SFG method with the grid, etc., I do like the basics of his soil mix.  It is:

  • 1/3 Compost
  • 1/3 Vermiculite
  • 1/3 Peat Moss or Coconut Coir

The catch is that the compost needs to be from several sources.  In other words, look at the ingredients that go into  the compost you plan to use.  If you’re not making the compost yourself (and maybe even if you are), you don’t want everything to be from one source.

For example, instead of buying 3 bags of compost that are all based on cow manure, you would want a bag of the cow manure-based compost, one of humus-based and another of poultry litter-based.

That being said, if you can’t find compost made from varying ingredients, try to at least get some from different manufacturers.

BTW, I do recommend reading Mel’s book, the All New Square Foot Gardening, Third Edition.

Other Ingredients?

Well, there are other “goodies” you can use to feed your soil, but that is a whole separate post.  I’ll come back and put a link to that post when I have it completed.  I am doing some experimenting, and so far the results have been quite interesting.

Mixing it Up

I typically mix my contain gardening soil up in a wheelbarrow — those 20 gallon pots really take a lot to fill them up!  But sometimes, I only need to make up enough for a small planter.

For a small batch, I get one of those 5-gallon buckets (like you can get at Home Depot or Lowes) and scoop in a few trowels worth of compost.  Next I’ll put in a trowel of vermiculite, another of perlite and then a scoop or two of coconut coir.  I’ll mix that around with my trowel until it’s nice and blended, then pour it into its pot.

If the pot doesn’t end up being quite full enough, I’ll just throw in a handful or two of each of the above, then mix it all up by hand.

Compost is Your Plant’s Friend

I’d be remiss if I didn’t talk a little more about compost.  If you have your own pile, you have ready access to it, and it’s probably full of all sorts of goodies for your tomato plants.  If you don’t have a compost pile, you’ll need to go with a bagged compost.

When you walk down the aisles of your garden center, you’re likely to find several different brands of bagged compost.  Take a look at the bags and read the ingredients.  In Florida where I live, it’s heavy on the composted cow manure — believe it or not, we’re one of the top states for producing cattle (and you just thought we were beaches).  What’s harder to find are composts from forest humus or mushroom compost.  Read the labels, and if you can, get at least two different kinds.  Each type is a little different with the (good) soil bacteria and/or (good) fungi, and so provides a more balanced set of nutrients.

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that all you need in your container is compost, though — it’s a bit too heavy (been there, done that).  You will need to mix it with one or more of the perlite, vermiculite, etc. before planting your tomatoes in it.

For the few times I’ve planted in straight compost, the plants didn’t do so great.  Yes, they grew and produced tomatoes but they seemed didn’t grow or produce as well as the containers where I had a mix.

Whew — that was a long post.  Hopefully this has been helpful for you!

Container Gardening and Tomatoes

Container gardening and tomatoes really do go together.  After all, you will still give the plant what it needs — good soil, plenty of water, fertilizer (organic or not) and lots of sunshine.

You’ll just be doing it in a different place.

Containers 101

You can’t just grab any old container and stick your tomato plant in it — as the old saying goes, “size matters”.  You need to consider the size of the plant versus the size of the container.  Typically, the container measurement will be in gallons.

For a determinate tomato, you can usually get away with a 5-gallon container, although a 7 gallon is nicer, if you can get one.  Since determinate tomatoes have a limited lifespan, they are usually smaller — and sometimes a lot smaller.   For the itty-bitty plants, you could even use a 3 gallon pot.

When it comes to the indeterminate plants, container size does make a difference, between a decent enough harvest and a good harvest.  Most indeterminate plants are pretty darn big (I’ve had Brandywines grow to 6 feet tall and 5 feet wide when I let them), so your container needs to reflect that.

For these hefty plants, I use containers anywhere from 15 gallons (for the smaller ones) up to 25 gallons for the Brandywine and Kellogg’s Breakfast tomatoes.

Yes, you can grow indeterminate tomato plants in smaller containers; but when you have a big plant, anything smaller than 12 gallons will definitely sacrifice some tomato production.

With the exception of indeterminate dwarf tomatoes — you can go with a 7 gallon container, and even a 5-gallon for a smaller dwarf.

The Dirt on Soil

One of the downsides of moving to an all-container garden is that I have to buy a lot of soil.  Nope, I can’t just shovel what’s on the ground into my containers.  For one, I’d have a lot of big holes in the yard, LOL.  Second, it wouldn’t be great soil for the most part.  My compost pile won’t fill all the containers — what’s a person to do?

And that is to drive on down to the lawn and garden center and buy lots of bags of compost and potting soil.  And when it turns out I made a bad choice in potting soil, I have to turn around and buy some perlite, vermiculite and/or sphagnum moss to amend my bad choice.

And when I get all those (very heavy) bags home, I still have to get that soil into the containers.  So yeah, it’s a pain to move from in-ground to container gardening all in one fell swoop.  But if you’re just trying out a couple of containers to get your feet wet, it’s really not bad at all.

What’s in Your Potting Soil?

I have learned that not all bags labeled potting soil are created equal.  Some are really nice, others not so much.  What you have to remember is that your plants need to be able to drink and breathe.  It’s an important topic, so I have a whole separate post talking just about soil for container gardens.

Have you ever watered a planter that was filled with sand?  You know that maybe 15 minutes after watering it, the soil is dry again.  This means you need to increase the water-holding capacity of sandy soils.

What about a clay soil — water it, come back tomorrow and it might still be “clay soup”.  In this situation, you need to increase the drainage capability.

So, compost is first on my list of “necessary ingredients” in a good potting soil, because it can both increase water-holding for sandy soil, and help with drainage on clay-based soils.  However, compost alone might make the soil too heavy.  Enter perlite, which lightens the soil, to give the roots breathing room.

(BTW, perlite is a natural substance, as are its comrades vermiculite and sphagnum moss.)

My current favorite ready-made potting soil is from Vigoro, in the orange bags labeled as organic.  Very nice consistency, if a bit on the pricy side.  I don’t have to add anything to it — just pour it into the container and plant away!

Surprisingly, Miracle-Gro’s potting soil leaves a lot to be desired — it’s very heavy and the bags I got were full of sticks (not my idea of proper drainage).  I like most of their stuff, but the potting soil is low on my “buy again next time” list.  I have had to add perlite and sphagnum moss to lighten it up some.  Plus, I am not all that crazy about all the fertilizer they include in it.

Mixing Your Own

I think I’ll stop for now, since this has gotten fairly long, and write up a separate entry for ideas on mixing your own potting soil.  So until next time — keep on growing!